Agriculture Remains Key to Somalia’s Economic Growth and Poverty-Reduction

According to the report  released  March 28th , Somalia’s livestock and crop subsectors have been buffeted by an increasingly fragile and degraded natural environment and more frequent and severe cycles of drought and floods. These factors, combined with insecurity, weak government institutions and a deterioration of flood control, irrigation, and transport infrastructure in the south-central regions, have led to a severe decrease in crop yields.

The report, which conducts a comprehensive historical review of Somalia’s major agricultural subsectors (livestock, crops, forestry, and fishing), analyzes the subsectors’ key medium- and long-term development potential and constraints and outlines policy and investment opportunities. It is part of a wider Country Economic Memorandum (CEM) series investigating growth potential across sectors to assist Somalia in its implementation of the National Development Plan (2017-2019), and the preparation of the subsequent plan.

Livestock and crops remain the main sources of economic activity, employment, and exports in Somalia. Agriculture’s share of gross domestic product (GDP) is approximately 75%, and represents 93% of total exports, mostly linked to robust livestock exports in the recent pre-drought years. Sesame is now the largest export among crops, followed by dried lemon, in the wake of the total collapse of banana exports. Despite Somalia’s rich fish stocks, coastal fishing has remained small-scale and artisanal while foreign commercial vessels have enjoyed both legal and illegal harvesting offshore.

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